Mark Silk

About Mark Silk

Mark Silk graduated from Harvard College in 1972 and earned his Ph.D. in medieval history from Harvard University in 1982. After teaching at Harvard in the Department of History and Literature for three years, he became editor of the Boston Review.

In 1987 he joined the staff of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where he worked variously as a reporter, editorial writer and columnist.

In 1996 he became the founding director of the Leonard E. Greenberg Center for the Study of Religion in Public Life at Trinity College and in 1998 founding editor of Religion in the News, a magazine published by the Center that examines how the news media handle religious subject matter. In 2005, he was named director of the Trinity College Program on Public Values, comprising both the Greenberg Center and a new Institute for the Study of Secularism in Society and Culture directed by Barry Kosmin. In 2007, he became Professor of Religion in Public Life at the College.

Professor Silk is the author of "Spiritual Politics: Religion and America Since World War II" and "Unsecular Media: Making News of Religion in America." He is co-editor of "Religion by Region," an eight-volume series on religion and public life in the United States, and co-author of "The American Establishment," "Making Capitalism Work," and "One Nation Divisible: How Regional Religious Differences Shape American Politics." He inaugurated "Spiritual Politics" in 2007.

Stories

Pope Francis to the rescue?

How good is it that the world is head-over-heels in love with Pope Francis? In the opinion of Commonweal editor Paul Baumann, writing in Slate, not so good, at least as far as the church itself is concerned. I beg to differ.

The resurrection of the Crown Market

A few weeks ago I wrote about the death of West Hartford’s Crown Market, the beloved kosher grocery store that has been serving the greater Hartford Jewish community for three-quarters of a century. God forbid that I should leave the impression that this was the end of the story. For within days, Henry Zachs, the community’s […]

Taxing Mormon temples

A friend of mine who practices First Amendment law is not happy that the European Court of Human Rights on Tuesday upheld a British refusal to permit the Mormon Temple in Preston tax-free status as a place of public worship. “It’s another indication of how equality is overriding religious liberty,” he emailed.