Mark Silk

About Mark Silk

Mark Silk graduated from Harvard College in 1972 and earned his Ph.D. in medieval history from Harvard University in 1982. After teaching at Harvard in the Department of History and Literature for three years, he became editor of the Boston Review.

In 1987 he joined the staff of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where he worked variously as a reporter, editorial writer and columnist.

In 1996 he became the founding director of the Leonard E. Greenberg Center for the Study of Religion in Public Life at Trinity College and in 1998 founding editor of Religion in the News, a magazine published by the Center that examines how the news media handle religious subject matter. In 2005, he was named director of the Trinity College Program on Public Values, comprising both the Greenberg Center and a new Institute for the Study of Secularism in Society and Culture directed by Barry Kosmin. In 2007, he became Professor of Religion in Public Life at the College.

Professor Silk is the author of "Spiritual Politics: Religion and America Since World War II" and "Unsecular Media: Making News of Religion in America." He is co-editor of "Religion by Region," an eight-volume series on religion and public life in the United States, and co-author of "The American Establishment," "Making Capitalism Work," and "One Nation Divisible: How Regional Religious Differences Shape American Politics." He inaugurated "Spiritual Politics" in 2007. In 2014 he became Religion News Service Contributing Editor.

Stories

A cheer for Kim Davis

I don’t doubt that Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis believes she will go to hell if she issues a marriage license to a same-sex couple. However, I rise to cheer not the steadfastness of her faith but the usefulness of the object lesson she has provided the country on the limits of free exercise in this country.

A quiz for the right-to-not-bake folks

The Cassandras of religious liberty were back in full cry last week after a Colorado appeals court upheld a judge’s decision not to let baker David Phillips refuse to bake a cake for Charlie Craig and David Mullins, who wanted one to celebrate their marriage.

Nature versus religion

Living amidst purple mountain majesties and other wonders of nature is likely to turn you away from religious adherence, claim a couple of Baylor academics who’ve got the multivariate factor analysis to back it up. But don’t take it too seriously.